CREATIVE LICENSE

Collections & Collaborations

With over 30 years of design and licensing experience before creating Three Pears, Mike has assembled a design team with professionals who understand how to create collections for collaborations with big box retailers and manufacturers. From the best floor covering companies to the hottest pillow and bedding distributors and retailers, Three Pears has a growing body of work of close to 500 finished designs and products ready to go. Included are projects for textiles, art, stationery, tabletop, fashion, accessories, apparel, wallcovering, bed and bath, luggage and bags, activewear, footwear, furniture, and lighting.

They are excited to be so close to announcing many new collaboration agreements and launch dates for new collections at shows like High Point Home Furnishings Market, NY Now, Surtex, Atlanta Gift Show, and pop ups around the country. For the latest updates and press releases, go to NEWS on this website. Subscribe to their IG or FACEBOOK pages for access to event calendars, invitations to launches and pop ups, and other fun venues in the planning stages.

If you are interested in knowing more about how Three Pears can collaborate with your company, contact andrea@threepearsproductions.com

For Kidults everywhere – a reminder that we are getting back to more organic livelihoods. Love a goat, save the planet!

A hidden gem found in over 6000 works of art – this dancing couple inspired a love collection including a Valentine’s Day launch.

At first glance, we thought we saw a goat. Some of us thought we saw a fawn. But with no known inspiration piece, interpretation is wide open. This piece inspired textiles, wallpapers, and fashion products.

A remarkable work of art showing adults emerging from the shadows as our artist feels like true inclusion is no longer just a dream, a broken heart comes together in puzzle pieces representing the many identities on the human spectrum.

We found this little study of interconnected flowers and a beast giving someone the side eye. It became patterns for many things including flip flops.

We like to call some of our work “mining for motifs.” And the artwork collection is a gold mine of possibilities – shapes and linework unlike anything we have seen before. We use what we need to develop products like this silk charmeuse scarf.

Some of the work we find is 10 or more years old. Still so relevant when rainbows are everywhere, but none are quite as rad as these!

Much of what we discover are studies in various mediums and subject matter. These little geometric studies gave birth to lots of very commercially viable products like this gorgeous soft brushed rayon throw.

Nikki wanted to see this study communicated as a universe of galaxies. In the final artwork we embedded a kind of Morse code by changing the order of lines of 4 butterfly galaxies. When communication is behind your message – design gets to break out and share that message – albeit sometimes in subtle ways.

Aaron’s love of structure and connection drew him to a study of shapes that gave way to a fantastic contemporary pattern with a mid-century meets 1960’s style.

Beans beans everywhere. A study of crescent shapes and numbers becomes a simple modified ditsy with edge.

We love finding studies of flowers in the bank of artwork. Between these two flowers and our favorite heart, Julieta created a fresh tossed floral in rich red and pink tones for wallpaper, wrapping paper and textiles.

A study of divided circles and colors took us in several directions including one with a blueprint style.

When we found these old Etruscan studies we not only saw two great drawings to work with, but also a wealth of elements perfect for motif development, plus amazing linework to use to create new patterns.

There were less than ten drawings that Mike saw in his first meeting with JaLynn before he said, “I’m in!” and this curious study of a very old rug design was the first we pulled out to work with. It reminded him loosely of Central American Molas. The elements, subject matter, color, linework, and the way the pieces influenced each other’s shape and form continually return to the design desk for other product and pattern development.